Top 50 Prospects

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1. MYLES GARRETT, DE
School: Texas A&M | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Arlington, TX
Height/Weight: 6-4 / 272 lbs.

Dominant pass-rush ability and production in college. Remarkable burst off the snap. His first three steps can throw an offense into disarray. When he times the snap, tackles have almost no chance of catching him at the edge. Wicked, whirling, dervish inside spin move that’s reminiscent of Dwight Freeney’s. Charges, coils, and springs up into tackles to help facilitate a quality bull rush. Game-wrecking potential. Can play with a hand in the ground or standing. Able to spin in either direction out of block engagement. Lightning-fast inside charge extremely disruptive against the run. Gobbles up grass with long strides in open-field pursuit. Plus acceleration to the runner. Quick twitch creates ability to bound suddenly into running backs looking to charge past line of scrimmage. Outstanding rate as a tackle finisher with running backs and quarterbacks rarely escaping his clutches. Looks to maintain run fits rather than play hero ball. Has ability to play on both sides of the line of scrimmage. Relies heavily on tremendous athleticism and explosion. At times, will take too long to activate counter moves when initial attack has stalled. Effort level appears closely tied to fatigue level at times. As pass rusher, uses hands reactively too often rather than proactively. Gets too cozy with blockers and will ride block for too long. Needs more urgency in disengagement. Would benefit with violent stick-and-move punch quickness into blockers. Has to work overtime to set a strong edge. Elite edge rusher who possesses rare explosiveness and the fluid-movement skills and agility of an NBA shooting guard. Good size, but he’s never likely going to be a hold-your-ground run defender, and might be best suited as an outside linebacker. However, his ability to explode into the backfield through a gap or around the edge gives him disruptive potential on every snap. Garrett still needs to fine-tune his pass-rush strategy and could stand to give more consistent effort from the start of the snap until the whistle. But his pass-rush production and athletic traits point toward an all-pro career.

2. JONATHAN ALLEN, DT
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Leesburg, VA
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 286 lbs.

Plays outside and inside. Quick off the ball. Superior hand-grappler who can control the wrists and forearms of his opponents with accurate hand placement over wild chops and slaps. Varied approach as a pass rusher. Excellent athletic ability and possesses flexible hips. Able to coordinate hands, feet, and hips to climb over the edge against tackles. Has play strength and quickness to rip through the weak inside post of a guard. Can club with either hand to soften the edge of a blocker. Has posted consistent quarterback pressure and sack numbers despite playing in less than half of the defensive snaps. Alert against the run. Quick to diagnose the mesh point against zone reads and gives chase to the ball. Strong on the edge. Has speed down the line to close down back-side cuts. Feet never seem to stop. Lacking the height teams look for from defensive ends. Not very long and could struggle to win the race for hand positioning against long NFL tackles. Found himself engulfed by linemen with mass from time to time. A move inside could require more bulk on his bones. Not built to take on double-team blocks for a living. Doesn’t possess lateral quickness and twitch to contain speedy running backs from getting the corner when he’s at defensive end. Teams utilizing one-gap scheme could question his lack of tackles on other side of the line. Might have benefitted by playing along so much NFL talent up front. Outstanding leader and athlete with an ability to rush the passer from outside or inside. Has produced against the run and pass thanks to his strength, agility, elite hand usage, and plus footwork. He might not be the cleanest fit inside as a full-time tackle for some teams, but his talent should trump any size concerns. Allen is a likely first-round selection with Pro Bowl potential down the road.

3. JAMAL ADAMS, SS
School: LSU | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Carrollton, TX
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 214 lbs.

Will not hesitate for one second as a hitter. Steps downhill looking to punish running backs to set a tone for defense. Toggles between patient and urgent in treks to the ball. Plays off blockers. Approaches target with open arms and wide, balanced base to limit escape routes. Intelligent field general. Gets secondary aligned properly. Plays with plus balance in coverage. Pattern reader who can digest combinations. Alert for misdirection keys from offense. Party crasher on screen plays. Can handle coverage responsibilities against tight ends. Five interceptions and two recovered fumbles over last two seasons at LSU. Handsy and too willing to clamp onto receivers down the field. Hard-charging downhill, but a little stiff when asked to retreat. Long speed appears to be average on tape. Will give away some interceptions due to drops. Slower coming to balance as tackler on bursting runners between the tackles. Desire to limit cutbacks leads to challenging play-side tackles. Doesn’t pursue with expected vigor from across the field. Interchangeable safety with a sheriff’s mentality. Adams is a physical tone-setter who should thrive near the line of scrimmage or in a robber role. Should be a commanding presence in the locker room early on and his do-as-I-do play demeanor could be the catalyst for turning a struggling defense around quickly.

4. MALIK HOOKER, FS
School: Ohio State | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: New Castle, PA
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 206 lbs.

Outstanding instincts help him work ahead of the play despite average speed. Always probing quarterback’s eyes for clues. Quick to process and is decisive in action. Flows hard to where his instincts lead him. Has fluid movement of a basketball player in space. Leans and bends into his turns for greater body control. Always active and in constant on-field search for optimal positioning. Hyper-aware of incoming targets to his area. Just as comfortable from “robber” spot as high safety. Mirrors quarterback’s eyes to challenge the passing lane. Very rarely takes a false step. Has loose hips for sudden stop-start to cover in space. Can range over the top to challenge the deep ball. Chooses path to the football over path to the man. Strong hands at the catch point lead to takeaways. Can disguise coverage and hustle back into position. Will strike receivers with some force to jar throws loose. Just one year of experience. Raw and still learning nuances of the position. More instinctive against the pass than run. At times can be a step slow to trigger downhill to take on the run. Will take some questionable downhill angles to the ball. Not overly physical against the run. Will duck head and go way low as a tackler. Below-average finisher. Comes in hot rather than coming to balance as a striker. Arm-tackler who needs to tighten up his mechanics. Will get caught guessing rather than reading. Squats on tight ends and slot receivers from man and gets grabby at the top of the route. His instincts are always bringing him to the football and when he gets there he has the ball skills to take it away. His lack of game experience and issues with tackle consistency will likely show themselves early in his career, but his ability to flip the field is worthy of an aggressive projection. He has the talent to be a high-impact starter for years in the NFL.

5. SOLOMON THOMAS, DE
School: Stanford | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: Coppell, TX
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 273 lbs.

Lined up at multiple positions. Has ravenous approach to the game. Gets out of the blocks quickly and attacks with early, skilled hands. Stays hungry and wants to feast. Powerful for his size. Shows ability to win with power or quickness. Outstanding athleticism. Fluid in his play. Transitions from move to move. Unpredictable pass rush. Attacks both the edges and can crank up a bull rush. Uses swipes, rips and arm-over to unlock his rush. Hands and feet work in unison. Has lightning-quick spin move he can access to unhinge from block and find new life in his rush. Violent disengagements from blocks leave no doubt blocker is whipped. Relentless approach combined with athleticism makes block recoveries extremely difficult in run or pass. Refuses extended engagements to blockers and works himself free. Very good pursuit speed and range as playmaker. Considered a “tweener” by scouts, who believe he could struggle to keep enough weight on his frame to play along interior. Length is below average as five-technique. Plays with inconsistent pad level. Tends to play taller as play rolls along and can get washed out of plays by strong down blocks. Hands are quick but need more consistent pop behind them. Overall play strength can be improved. “Big and strong” across from him causes some issues. Gets engulfed at times. Snap-count guesser with seven offsides penalties in 2016. Explosive defender who combines strength, quickness, and a muscle-car motor to drive him around the field making play after play. Has the hands and feet to be a quick-win specialist and the size to fit as a 4-3 or 3-4 defensive end who can reduce inside for pass-rush downs. He has all the athletic traits to become a high-impact player and possesses more than enough skill and talent to believe he will continue to elevate his game as a pro. Thomas has the potential to become a future all-pro.

6. MARSHON LATTIMORE, CB
School: Ohio State | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: Cleveland, OH
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 193 lbs.

Parks under receiver’s chin at line of scrimmage. Uses disruptive inside hand to slow the release and can punch out of his pedal. Patient from his press, utilizing well-timed opening to match the receiver. Plays with explosive hip flip that jump-starts him into top speed when forced to turn and run. Has balance and footwork to remain in phase with target throughout the route. Has electric, flat-footed closing burst. Can shadow a nine route from release to completion. Has twitch to drive hard toward the throw from his lateral shuffle. Plays with plus instincts. Has burst and instincts to make plays from any coverage asked of him. Forceful open-field tackler. Works through blockers to get to both wide receiver screens and running plays. Wrap-up hitter who sees what he hits. Only one year of starting experience. Wasn’t tested by high-end receiving talent very often. Will be much tougher to consistently slow NFL receivers with jam and might have to learn to play some off coverage. Showed slight transition hitch when matched up against in inside release. Will read receiver’s eyes to assess ball-timing down the field rather than getting his head around early. Average-sized, one-year starter with explosive athleticism and a loaded tool box. He has the feet, hips and agility to be a lockdown cornerback and the ball skills to make teams pay for looking in his direction. His lack of experience could show up early, but he has the confidence and competitive nature that should help him overcome those issues. He has the ability to become a Pro Bowl cornerback early in his career.

7. LEONARD FOURNETTE, RB
School: LSU | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: New Orleans, LA
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 235lb

Built like a linebacker with speed like a receiver. Long, powerful strides get speedy turnover. Click and go runner who hits his second gear faster than most big backs you’ll ever see. Able to accelerate and scream around the corner for chunk runs against linebackers lacking speed or urgency to the edge. Violent finisher looking to intimidate run-support safeties with crushing blows behind lower pads. Runs feet through any and all contact. Has balance and power to plow through tackle attempts on an angle. Punishing stiff arms go viral. Has experience running from two-back, single-back and off-set looks. Hands are adequate in passing game. Can create for himself with power and speed. Wins in short-yardage and goal-line situations. Doesn’t make many defenders miss with open field shake. Aggressive, take-on style could lead to shortened career. Struggles to elude sudden traffic at line of scrimmage. Plays through a straw. Excitable runner in need of more patience. Too quick to hit the accelerator and slam into defenders when there are still cuts and yards left in the play. Runs to obvious daylight but needs to learn to anticipate and finesse the crease in traffic. Throws half-hearted, grazing shoulder as chip blocker. Pass protection and routes need extensive work. High-end talent with rare blend of size, speed and power. Comparisons to Adrian Peterson feel lofty, but from a physical standpoint, he’s there. Fournette doesn’t have the wiggle to make defenders miss and his vision can be iffy. However, if your run fits and tackling aren’t sound, he can take it the distance in an instant. May have durability concerns due to physical running style, but has All-Pro potential.

8. REUBEN FOSTER, ILB
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Auburn, AL
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 229 lbs.

Has a ferocious hitting style that puts offensive skill positions on alert. Outstanding athlete with springy, reactive feet. Loose hips and long stride allows him to open and chase immediately. Has elite sideline-to-sideline range. Tough as nails. Brings swagger to a linebacking corps. Never passive and always means it. Willing to take his shots downhill and into gaps. Lands strong warning blows on climbing guards early in the game. Coverage ability is an asset. Can carry long speed against running backs on wheel routes and nine routes. Has worked to improve tackling technique, which has yielded higher success rate of finishes. Instincts are just average. Overly reliant on speed and athleticism over instincts and feel. Can be a tick slow to respond to play-action. Inconsistent defeating blocks. Too eager to take on everyone at the point of attack. Gets shoulder covered up firing into incoming blockers. Needs to improve stack and shed technique to keep himself clean. Will drop his head at times as tackler. Foster is a vicious hitter with elite playmaking range and an ability to toggle between 225 and 240 pounds. Athleticism gives him cover ability. Has Pro Bowl potential as a 3-4 inside linebacker or a 4-3 weak-side linebacker.

9. RYAN RAMCZYK, OT
School: Wisconsin | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Stevens Point, WI
Height/Weight: 6-6 / 310 lbs.

Fires out of stance with pads tucked under bent knees. Accelerates into target. Punch and extend drive blocker with hip flip to lock in leverage. Pushes with flat back and duck-footed follow through to sustain and walk defender off his mark. Technician who has been taught the fundamentals. Good tape in both power and zone plays. Athletic, easy mover. Balance and body control are building blocks of his play. Initial footwork in run game is impressive. Urgent quickness in reach blocks and can get there most of the time. Smooth pass slides with hands that are always punch ready. Hands land with flat feet, great accuracy, force and timing. Keeps his chin tucked and back flat. Utilizes stiff inside hand to protect against spin moves. Excellent awareness against twists and blitzes. Has linear frame with narrow shoulders and short arms for the position. Lack of a broad frame makes protecting his edge more challenging. Edge players with length land jabs to his frame to create separation. Will play too upright and straight-legged at times. Can’t afford to be late out of stance as his first two kick slides don’t gain much ground. Could have issues on redirect blocks against inside shots. Extremely confident tackle with the athleticism to stay on the left side and the technique to make an early impact as a starter. Ramczyk has the core strength and body control that should keep him connected to blocks in both the run and pass and he’s proven to be scheme versatile with his playing style. Ramczyk is an early starter with the potential to become a good starting left tackle.

10. O.J. HOWARD, TE
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Prattville, AL
Height/Weight: 6-6 / 251 lbs.

Has long arms and massive hands for his position. Tremendous acceleration into his routes. Has tools to torment defenses on second and third level. Play speed resembles a wide receiver’s when the ball is in the air. Linebackers have no shot against him in space. Can turn a short throw into a long gain. Light on his feet and smooth out of his breaks. Easy separator who creates instant throwing windows when he hits the gas. Natural pass catcher who plucks it away from his body. Can adjust to poorly thrown balls and secure contested catches. Shows no lack of toughness over the middle. Can be lined up all over the field. Has elite ceiling as playmaker. Lands his hands inside the frame as a blocker. Operates with wide base and attempts to snap hips into his block. Will need more muscle and mass to be an in-line blocker as a pro. Appears passive at times. Needs better hand strength to sustain his blocks. Can do better job of working feet into position after contact. Needs urgency in his routes to tilt defenders and get them guessing. Needs to show more elusiveness after the catch. Explosive talent who doesn’t make enough explosive plays. Howard has struggled to live up to hype that has come with his play-making ability while at Alabama, but some scouts put the blame on the staff and scheme. He has elite athletic traits and raw talent, but must add polish to go along with those attributes. Should become substantially more productive as a pro, but the difference between “potential weapon” and “elite tight end” will likely be tied to his desire and overall football character.

11. DEREK BARNETT, DE
School: Tennessee | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Nashville, TN
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 259 lbs.

Hands are strong, fast, efficient and lethal. Punch-and-discard winner. As rusher, swats are well-timed discarding tackle’s punch attempt. Attacks the edge with good forward lean and works hands and feet in harmony on road to the quarterback. Uses jab steps and lateral movement to search for the edge of the blocker. Has leverage and strength to play right through redirects. Not content to just set the edge — wants to make the play. Uses hand fighting and play strength to work through leverage points. Long strider who can crash down the line to challenge gap plays if unblocked. Punishing hitter. Delivers crushing tackles and sacks when given the opportunity. Hustle player who pursues the play with intent. Rag-dolls tight ends at point of attack. Plus field awareness recognizing play-action, reverses, and screens. Fluid enough to drop into space and play some zone. Admitted slow starter who has had issues with sluggishness to start a season. Will overthink it at times rather than just reacting. Can be undisciplined with guessing snap count and taking penalties. Change-of-direction issues typical of a broad-waisted big man. Struggles to redirect movements suddenly once momentum starts rolling downhill. Quarterbacks with pocket mobility can elude him. Feet are average. Initial burst upfield is average. Times snap count to help with his get-off. Aggressive forward charge opens him up to cut blocks. Long stride creates base inconsistencies at point of attack. Length is a concern. Loops to quarterback are rounded and might need a winning, inside counter move as a pro. Strong edge presence with NFL-caliber hand usage and play strength. Barnett is one of the most productive defensive linemen to come out of the SEC in quite some time despite lacking the length and twitch that teams usually look for off the edge. His awareness and play traits should keep him near the action and he has the talent to step into a starting base end spot right away. There could be coordinators who view him as an early down, outside backer in a 3-4 with the ability to put his hand in the ground on sub packages.

12. DALVIN COOK, RB
School: Florida State | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Miami, FL
Height/Weight: 5-11 / 213lbs

Uses choppy feet and compact stride length downhill. Keeps feet under him and is able to make lateral cuts at a moment’s notice. Flourished in zone, gap and power schemes at FSU. At his best running wide while setting up lead blockers. Slows flowing safeties and linebackers with hesitation steps and glances back inside. Has run-away gear around the corner he keeps tucked away for special occasions. Darting style allows him to escape defenders who show gap commitment too soon. Plus vision. Quick to flow from first to second read on outside zone plays. Greedy redzone runner with ability to cash those checks. Comfortable in both one-back and two-back groupings. Rare ability to cut it all the way back across the grain. Changes direction with degree of subtlety on second level without gearing down. Not much of a dancer. Tends to get hit it up the field. Not always a tough inside runner. Can be early to bounce it outside rather than plant and go downhill. Needs to become more comfortable between the tackles. Excellent vision to the perimeter becomes cloudier between the b-gaps. Will duck head and finish a run prematurely rather than probing for more interior space. Ball security issues with 13 career fumbles. Suffers from focus drops out of backfield. Won’t square-up on blitzers and may not be reliable enough as blocker to play on third downs. Very talented runner with outstanding balance, footwork and burst. Cook lacks the power that you may find with some running backs in this year’s draft, but he is a homerun hitter with a resume featuring monster games against his most highly regarded opponents. Cook creates for himself with elusiveness and speed, but his value could be diminished by injuries, character and issues in pass protection. If everything checks out, he could become a rookie of the year candidate right away.

13. MITCHELL TRUBISKY, QB
School: North Carolina | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Mentor, OH
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 220lbs

Tall, solidly built passer. Outstanding athlete with the mobility and body strength to escape pressure and extend plays. Efficient pocket movements to climb and delicately operate amidst backfield pressure with his eyes downfield. Slightly above average arm strength and controls his ball speeds well. Shows consistent accuracy on short-to-intermediate passes and doesn’t force his receivers to work for it. Very confident passer who will use the entire field – steady play in late-game situations. Displays the ability to make anticipation throws on in- and out-breaking routes, delivering prior to the receiver starting his break. Almost 98 percent of his dropbacks came from shotgun. Will have to learn NFL footwork from under center which could take time. Benefits from offense loaded with RPOs (run-pass option) that pull linebackers forward and open easier throwing windows. Played in space-based passing attack that didn’t often ask him to throw to tight windows in traffic. Accuracy tends to drop when throwing on the move. Needs to improve his field awareness and better protect the ball when scrambling (four fumbles in 2016). Only one season of starting experience and after spending three years on the sidelines – showed patience to sit and wait his turn, but his inability to unseat Williams as the starter is a question mark. Trubisky is a high-end quarterback prospect who possesses NFL size, a big arm and the ability to throw with accuracy from the pocket or on the move. Despite playing in a spread-based offense, he’s a full-field reader who does a very good job of getting an early read on the safeties before crafting his course of action. Trubisky will have to become much more pocket aware and do a better job of recognizing and attacking blitzes to back NFL defensive coordinators off. He hasn’t put all the pieces together yet, but the puzzle is all right in front. Trubisky projects as a good starting quarterback with a high floor and the potential to be great.

14. TACO CHARLTON, DE
School: Michigan | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Pickerington, OH
Height/Weight: 6-6 / 277 lbs.

Rare combination of size, length and athletic traits as a rusher. Long-levered frame with athletic, knotted calves. Brings freaky athletic traits to table and is still growing into his body. Flashes instant reaction time off snap and up the field thanks to his twitch. Has enough upfield juice to push offensive tackles into hasty retreat. Generates pop through speed-to-power element. Very good flexibility throughout. Able to sink and swerve around corner if he gets early lead in race to the edge. Possesses hip swivel combined with shoulder turn to slip and flip around the corner of an offensive tackle he’s engaged with as a pass rusher. Rushes with forward lean that keeps his momentum downhill. Uses rip-and-stab move and an ominous spin move that could turn into a dominant rush trait in the NFL. Length gives him a shot at dramatically increasing his play-making ability against the run. Despite talent and traits, production and overall play has been uneven at Michigan. Earned full-time starting nod in just his final season. Consistency of anchor at point of attack in question. Can be rooted out of his gap by power. Can do better job of using his length to keep blockers off of him. Doesn’t make enough plays on other side of the line against run. Needs to show a nastier play demeanor at all times. Scouts question whether he has enough toughness for trench battles if bumped inside or to 5-technique. Charlton is an ascending prospect with the size, length, athleticism and pass-rushing potential that NFL general managers dream of. What you see today might not be what you get. While his production coming out of college will be modest, he could become a substantially better player as a pro if he’s committed to the weight room and willing to absorb coaching. High-impact defensive end with all-pro potential is his ceiling. His floor is solid starter.

15. HAASON REDDICK, OLB
School: Temple | Conference: AAC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Camden, NJ
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 237 lbs.

Explosive, quick-twitch athlete. Great flexibility with loose hips to turn, twist, and chase. Excellent reactive quickness and change-of-direction agility. Dynamic playmaker in space. Locks onto targets and instantly accelerates to the ball. Fluid mover around field. Has chase range over extended territory. Eyes work past blockers and into backfield. Slips and slides around the edge and through small creases. Always working feet into improved positioning after contact. Came in as a defensive back and has experience on all three levels. Has athleticism in space and necessary instincts to be legit cover talent as linebacker. Rushes with good bend and forward lean. Difficult to handle on tackle/end twists back inside. Turns corner with tight track to quarterback once he pries the edge open. Undersized by NFL standards for position he’s currently playing. Labors to disengage once size is on top of him. Will need more play strength to ward off NFL blockers. Improving with hands, but needs to continue technique work to control blockers. Lacks necessary bulk, length, and play strength to set a strong edge as an NFL 3-4 outside linebacker. Marginal speed-to-power ability. Connects and sticks to tackles when trying to bull-rush under their pads. Pass rush reliant upon athletic talent and cursory hand play. Needs more diversified rush plans. Slides off of too many tackles. Reddick’s speed and athleticism might give him a greater shot at impacting the game as a 3-4 inside linebacker or a 4-3 WILL rather than trying to bulk up and play the edge. An ascending prospect with a high-end potential if he can continue to hone his craft.

16. COREY DAVIS, WR
School: Western Michigan | Conference: MAC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Wheaton, IL
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 209 lbs.

NFL body with desired height, length and muscle tone. Athletic route runner with the lower body coordination to burst in/out of his breaks. Smooth release and route acceleration to achieve proper depth. Polished footwork and hides his intended path. Quickly shifts his gears after the catch to regain his momentum, showing the balance and vision to create as a ball-carrier. Tracks the ball very well with the hand strength to make acrobatic, off-balance catches. Routinely works back to the ball and attacks before the ball reaches his body. Doesn’t allow physical defensive backs to disrupt his focus, quickly resetting his eyes and rhythm mid-route. Enjoys blocking and gives consistent effort in this area. Will fight the ball at times with more double-catches and drops on his tape than ideal. Hears footsteps and focus will wane depending on what is going on around him. Room to improve his consistency in jump-ball situations. Shows route burst when in tempo, but lacks the suddenness to instantly accelerate to top speed after gearing down, allowing corners to catch him. Has the lower body quickness to beat press, but needs to use his hands more effectively to assist his release. Timing and technique as a blocker require refinement. Didn’t consistently face NFL-caliber defensive backs in the MAC.

17. JABRILL PEPPERS, SS
School: Michigan | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: East Orange, NJ
Height/Weight: 5-11 / 213 lbs.

Athletic and fluid in space with desired change of direction talent. Moves with the changing flow of a play. Willing to sacrifice body to honor contain against run. Jack of all trades. Can play slot, safety or linebacker in sub-packages in any given game. Won’t hesitate to race downhill once he diagnoses run. Hits with as much force as he can muster. Has big closing burst. Runs plays down from sideline to sideline. Able to knife into gaps and make tackles for losses or disrupt runs. Has man cover talent and is physical enough to handle most tight ends. Has enough quickness to match receivers. Aggressively re-routes receivers. Capable blitzer who buzzes in from all angles. Electric return man with ability to charge up crowd and his own sideline with big kick or punt return. Has experience carrying and catching the ball and as wildcat quarterback. Could offer red-zone flexibility on offense. Slow to recognize construct of play and can be found playing through a straw at times. Needs better recognition and anticipation to become an improvising play-maker. Doesn’t always trust his feet in coverage and will maul at the top of the route. Just a guy when asked to play deep safety. Slow to read and range until ball is in the air. Can be overzealous against play-action and drawn below his deep ball responsibilities. Too small for take-on duties at linebacker. Leads into tackles with ducked head. Opts to hit rather than wrap-up. The ultimate Swiss Army Knife on the collegiate level, and will likely play a hybrid role on the next level that allows him to blitz, cover and chase, Peppers’ draft value will be helped by his return ability and that is a role he should maintain throughout the earlier stages of his career. While Peppers doesn’t have the production teams expect from first-round defenders, he should benefit from a role that is more clearly defined on the next level.

18. JOHN ROSS, WR
School: Washington | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Long Beach, CA
Height/Weight: 5-11 / 188 lbs.

Vertical speed demands respect and creates open throws underneath. Corners open hips early to turn and sprint, leaving his curl and dig routes unchallenged. Feet are fire. On verticals from the slot, sells the corner route and stems to the post with a burst for easy separation and a comfortable throwing window for the quarterback. Hands are generally solid. Plus hand-eye coordination. Natural ball-tracker who locates the deep ball early and watches it. Dangerous show-and-go open-field ability after the catch. Able to win with slants or fades near the goal line. Eludes the first tackler and can turn a short one into a long one in a heartbeat. Has enough size to work from outside or from the slot. Saw four of his eight carries go for 15-plus yards. Has returned at least one kickoff for a touchdown in each of his three years at Washington. Undersized with below-average play strength. Needs to do better job of working back to the throw. Has to learn to make contested catches. Will need to sharpen his short and intermediate routes to become a true three-level target. Has had a major injury to both knees. The long-term health of both knees will be a concern that has to be answered at the combine. He should be able to step right in as a kick returner and a slot receiver, but teams with speed at tight end might utilize him outside to create extreme vertical stress on opposing safeties.

19. MARLON HUMPHREY, CB
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: Hoover, AL
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 197 lbs.

Well-versed in a variety of coverages. Plays with disciplined eyes and good balance between high-low responsibilities in zone. Good short-area acceleration to close out receivers and attack throwing lanes. Reactive athleticism helps erase coverage mistakes. Extremely competitive with an edge that spikes after he’s beaten. Timid receivers should take the day off. Aggressive from press with a powerful punch. Looks to intimidate when the opportunity arises. Drives receivers out of bounds and out of the play if their vertical release takes them too close to the boundary. Will not let a blocking receiver punk him. Tears through blocker and attacks downhill. Searches for opportunities to strip the ball. Impatient from press coverage. Opens inside or outside too early rather than waiting for a clear declare from receiver. Struggles to stay in phase throughout the route and allows separation opportunities. Feet are fast but sloppy. Footwork becomes bulky and balance diminishes when matched against quality route workers. Plays a scrambling style of coverage that is too reliant upon his athletic gifts. Issues playing the deep ball are a concern. From off coverage, overreacts to route fakes and opens the door to a big play. Can be slow to locate the ball and finds himself out of optimal position to play the ball. Talented height-weight-speed prospect who comes from NFL bloodlines. Might need time for his technique to catch up with his traits. Coverage inconsistencies could cause him to struggle against quality competition early on, but his mental makeup and recovery talent should help him pull through. Has the instincts and run-support skills to become an early starter for a zone-cover defense, but it will be hard for teams looking for a lockdown, man corner to pass on all of his physical gifts.

20. MIKE WILLIAMS, WR
School: Clemson | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Vance, SC
Height/Weight: 6-4 / 218 lbs.

Sells vertical push to create an early hip turn from backpedaling cornerbacks. Uses hands to create late separation on vertical throws. Long arms and big hands can go get throws at their highest point, snatching 50/50 balls away from his in-air competitors. Ball tracking is impeccable. Able to track it inside, outside or over his shoulder. Hands catcher who plucks it away from his body. Concentration ramps up when routes take him between the hashes. Works middle of the field with no reservations about what is lingering. Can make cornerbacks miss after the catch and extend his play. Needs more commitment as a run blocker but has frame and strength to make a difference as a blocker. Natural pass catcher who will occasionally run into focus drops. Drops issue found him over second half of the season. Route work lacks focus and energy. Creates very little indecision from cornerbacks with his head fakes and jab steps. Ability to win with physical traits could dry up on next level. Could use better understanding of route leverage to open wider passing lanes for quarterbacks. Plant-and-go at the stem lacks crispness as does acceleration from his cuts. Average release quickness. Gets hung up by press corners with a good lead jab. Needs to play to his size. Gets muscled against sideline too often. Williams looks the part of a WR1 and has shown an ability to work all three levels of the field after coming back from his 2015 neck injury. Williams is tough enough to be a high-volume target while working the middle of the field and his size and ball skills make him a formidable foe in the end zone. He’ll have to be coached up with his routes and releases, but he has the talent to become a big safety blanket for a young quarterback.

21. DAVID NJOKU, TE
School: Miami (Fla.) | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: Cedar Grove, NJ
Height/Weight: 6-4 / 246 lbs.

Elite athlete and seam buster deluxe. Can stick a foot in the ground and break in either direction at a 90-degree angle in shorter routes. Tremendous acceleration out of breaks to separate and widen the window for quarterbacks. Opens the throttle in open field. When he catches it on the move, the YAC yards can become an avalanche. Can go up and over most everyone he faces. Hand quickness to get a last second push-off and still get hands up to secure catch. Finds soft spots against zones. Plays outside, from the slot and in-line. Willing to compete as a blocker. Can push defensive backs around from slot. Gets early arm extension into defender and looks to create some turn. Shows lateral blocking ability for zone scheme. Inexperienced at the position and still a work in progress. Needs to add to his play strength to handle in-line blocking as a pro. Hands too high and wide at point of attack. Focus drops were a problem. Speed allows him to uncover on downfield routes and hasn’t had to learn nuances of setting up defenders with route work. Needs to get head around and find ball quicker when working over top of linebacker. Ascending pass catching talent with elite athleticism and enough fight in his run blocking to believe that he can be lined up anywhere on the field at any time. Njoku is still growing into his body and has to add to his play strength, but his playmaking potential and elite traits should make him a future Pro Bowler.

22. DESHAUN WATSON, QB
School: Clemson | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Gainesville, GA
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 215lbs

Tremendous leader and winner. Good pocket posture with quiet upper body. Good pocket mobility and doesn’t show much panic when pocket gets noisy. Sacked just 32 times over his last 1,181 drop-backs. Willing to stand in and deliver the ball against rib-wreckers on a clear path for him. Has history of clutch play in big games and big moments. Averaged 472 yards of total offense with eight total touchdowns and one interception in his two championship appearances against Alabama. Throws with anticipation and touch. Arm strength currently limited by mechanical issues that are correctable. Big, strong hands to pump fake and manipulate. Keeps ball tucked near his chest when scanning. Has compact, over-the-top release that uncorks a tight, pretty spiral. Throws with adequate accuracy on the move. Has traits to operate out of boot-action attack. Tremendous athlete who has ability to pick up chunks of yardage on ground. Has called running plays could ignite a stagnant offense. Accuracy runs hot and cold. Tends to over-stride on drive throws, causing release point to drop and balls to sail. Ball placement on crossing routes and slants needs to improve. Will leave throws behind intended targets. Deep-ball accuracy has been scatter-shot over his last two seasons at Clemson, with throws sailing well beyond his target. Design of offense limited his need to make full-field reads. Has to become adept at working through progressions and playing chess against safeties. Needs to let routes develop rather than rushing anticipatory throws. Watson’s transition from Clemson’s offense to a pro-style attack will obviously take time, but his combination of intangibles and athletic ability make him a worthy selection.

23. MALIK MCDOWELL, DT
School: Michigan State | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Detroit, MI
Height/Weight: 6-6 / 295 lbs.

Combination of arm length and flexible torso allow him to slither into gaps and create disruptions for blockers. Freaky combination of size and athleticism. Can overwhelm blockers with pure strength and explosiveness when his feet are right. Strong enough in lower half to play through contact and cause stress in the pocket. Has tremendous amount of untapped potential waiting to be unlocked. Quick, strong hands in pass rush. Able to attack the edge with club-and-swim pet move. Can crank up a pocket-caving bull rush. Can redirect his weight and maintain pursuit of scrambling mobile quarterbacks. Long frame and play speed can close out perimeter runs and foil them before corner is turned. Elite playmaking radius. Explosive lateral movement and quickness. Will be extremely difficult to cross face as he learns the position. Has experience up and down the defensive line. Plays with inconsistent base width and overall balance. Struggles to keep feet clean and ends up on the ground. Lines up in narrow, three-point stance from interior and struggles to fight back against down blocks and double teams. Can be washed out of his gap too often. High center of gravity made interior work a challenge at times. Can bend, but lets high pad level get the best of him. Doesn’t consistently utilize his length with first hands. Has to become better at controlling the point of attack with his natural attributes. Needs to punch and control rather than leaning on blockers. Has similar physical traits and abilities of Arik Armstead and DeForest Buckner, but may not share their football character. Lacked production along the interior and could benefit from a move to a defensive end spot in a 4-3 or 3-4 front. McDowell is raw, but when he flashes, it can be blinding. McDowell is an explosive, ascending prospect with All-Pro potential if he grows into his body and takes the necessary coaching.

24. FORREST LAMP, OG
School: Western Kentucky | Conference: C-USA
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Venice, FL
Height/Weight: 6-4 / 309 lbs.

Compact build but not lacking athleticism. Able to redirect weight back inside. Showed nimble feet when handling spin moves and inside shots. Patient. Works feet and hips into position before engaging. Secures block with chopping feet and quality positioning. Bends and looks for low-man leverage with hip thrust under him. Uses short, controlled punch in run game. Clever with hands in pass protection. Throws short, teaser jab with outside hand to entice rushers into premature hand fighting. Effective counter-puncher defending edge and clears his chest and re-sets hands if defender gets into him first. Rarely bull-rushed. Processes quickly when defense runs games up front. Average frame and might not be able to add much more bulk to it. Lack of height and arm length will likely drive him inside. Expedited engagement on interior could prevent counter-punching style with hands. Will have to learn to keep hands in ready position and shoot them with tighter track into the frame. Positional blocker lacking NFL power as a drive-blocking guard. Lack of girth will require consistent pad level and a little wider base. Four-year starter at left tackle whose lack of length will likely force him inside on the next level. He has the athleticism to handle athletic interior rushers while being able to fit into diverse rushing attacks that ask more from the guards and centers. His ability to potentially line up at tackle, guard or center will only increase his value.

25. TAKKARIST MCKINLEY, OLB
School: UCLA | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Richmond, CA
Height/Weight: 6-2 / 250 lbs.

Relentless worker bee on the field. Refuses to give offensive tackles a snap to catch their breath. Not a content player and is always charging towards the ball. Plus closing burst to sideline enables contain. Unusually adept at bouncing off of blocks and maintaining play focus. Good stop/start change of direction talent. Long strides eat up ground in space. Combines speed with long arms for increased tackle radius. Became a playmaker. Saw 36 percent of his tackles come within two yards or less of line of scrimmage while sack total spiked considerably. Spins out of wash down blocks to work back towards the play. Consistently stuffs cut attempts. Raw, but pass rush flashes some speed to power. Pass rush counters fueled by lateral agility and effort. Hand skill and overall usage is completely uncultivated and impedes pass rush potential. Lacks slaps, swipes and a serviceable rip move to grease the edge as a rusher. Punch has very little force. Needs to get hands and feet need in unison. Long arms are irrelevant at times due to slow punch. Lacks bend around the edge. Upright pass rush allows tackles to flatten him up and over the rush arc with just an average punch. Redirected too easily. Needs to continue to add play strength. Success predicated on effort over rush talent and functional power. Needs to combine all three elements to his game. Ascending edge prospect who racked up impressive TFL and sack numbers despite a relatively raw approach and skill set. He’s a little stiff in his lower body, but flashes good athleticism once the ball is snapped. McKinley’s motor is a translatable characteristic, but improved hand usage and pass rush mechanics are what could elevate his game to another level as a starting, 3-4 outside linebacker.

26. GARRETT BOLLES, OT
School: Utah | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Lehi, UT
Height/Weight: 6-5 / 297 lbs.

Movement skills are smooth and unencumbered. There isn’t an angle block he can’t get to. Smooth climbs to linebackers as a work-up blocker, and has rare ability to accelerate from that block up to a third target. Has lateral quickness in run game to cross-face from backside and seal on the play-side. Can take quick settle steps, sinks and scoops defensive ends on base blocks. Quick feet allow for more patience to scan for stunts. Can meet edge speed with quick sets in pass pro. Plays with a mean streak and loves to finish. Outstanding change of direction to mirror without a hitch in his transition. Keeps weight on inside foot in his slides. Moves feet into position against inside counters. Balanced in his pass sets and keeps blocks centered. Should get bigger and stronger with more weight work after unorthodox path to the draft. Pad level rises and he struggles to generate much movement against stout outside linebackers at point of attack. Needs better knee bend into second-level contact. Inconsistent in sustaining his blocks. Power can toss him off balance. May be limited by scheme fit. Needs to keep hands inside to bolster strength in his base. Lacks trust in his core power against speed-to-power. Leans into blocks with feet behind him to brace up. Will need sharper punch and more sink in his sets. Gives initial ground against power and doesn’t always anchor quickly. Will be 25 years old by opening of fall camp. Bolles clearly has elite athletic ability and foot quickness, but his lack of core strength and ability to sustain blocks against power across from him is a concern at this time. While he has Pro Bowl potential for a zone-scheme team, his floor will be a little lower than you might like in an early round pick.

27. CHRISTIAN MCCAFFREY, RB
School: Stanford | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Castle Rock, CO
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 199lbs

Smooth, controlled stride length with choppy feet for instant cuts and change of direction. Plus vision with above average anticipatory feel for opening creases. Hugs contours of the running lane and staggers and stutters his feet to maneuver in tight quarters. Protect football while running through traffic. Reads keys quickly on stretch plays. Sinks hips into sharp cuts. Equally adept darting inside or outside and is able to string moves together. Won’t dance on short runs — gets it downhill. Feet constantly in motion. Able to make defenders miss on all three levels. Willing to keep runs playside and alters his track seamlessly. Runs with multiple gears and is able to gear up or down instantly. Has experience in one-back, two-back and offset formations. Excellent hands out of backfield and can be used from slot. Devastating quickness out of breaks can mismatch linebackers. Experienced, capable punt and kick returner. Lacks desired size of an every-down back. Has some tread worn off his tires. Logged 300-plus touches (including returns) in each of the last two seasons and was asked to grind the gears for short yardage carries. Benefitted from physical, downhill offensive line. Takes foot off gas into contact. Doesn’t have NFL-caliber power to break tackles and create yardage for himself through power. Can shake tacklers, but lacks a twitchy burst to accelerate away after the cut. Average burst may not be enough to race past NFL speed on second level. Inconsistent squaring up blitzers in pass pro and ducks his head into contact. Multidimensional runner with flex appeal for teams looking for a player who can carry the ball 20 times or catch it 10 depending on the game plan. McCaffrey’s size, power and speed are just average, but he is able to create yardage for himself with his vision and elusiveness. McCaffrey’s ability to return punts and kicks could be the value sweetener that pushes his name into the first round.

28. TIM WILLIAMS, OLB
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Baton Rouge, LA
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 244 lbs.

Rockets out of stance like a track sprinter, but with shoulder pads on. True edge bending ability as a rusher. Pass-rush approach is more sophisticated than he is given credit for. Can win outside or inside making every rush a potential two-way go. Shows good feel for the pass-rush arc and understands when to attack the corner. Able to dip shoulder and pivot under and around an offensive tackle and into the quarterback. Hand usage well-timed as a rusher. Primarily a rusher but showed continuing improvement in technique at the point of attack. Should post impressive straight-line speed at the combine. Plus foot quickness with the smoothness to drop into coverage and operate in space on zone blitzes. Can be taken advantage of with screen passes and misdirection. Has sinewy build that resembles a move tight end more than an NFL edge rusher. Is improving as edge-setter but he still needs work. Would benefit from a stronger initial punch. Athletic tackles with a well-timed punch can stymie his rush plans. Needs to do better job of getting set pre-snap. Has some hip tightness that limits his stride length upfield and laterally. Williams’ career might be as a pass-rush specialist, but he’s talented enough at that endeavor to become a dangerous rush linebacker in the NFL. With experience rushing out of both the two and three point stances, Williams offers schematic versatility.

29. ZACH CUNNINGHAM, OLB
School: Vanderbilt | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Pinson, AL
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 234 lbs.

Play-making machine. Plays on a downhill tilt and is always looking to draw first blood. Fast to see it, process and respond. Creates tackles for losses by shooting gaps at appropriate angles. Has a good feel for blockers and uses varied speeds and subtle upper body turns to avoid blockers on second level. Quick in his lateral scrape and races ahead of blockers. Keeps play-side shoulder uncovered when flowing to the ball. Football magnet with outstanding tackle production and ability to create and recover turnovers. Rangy long strider with instincts and play speed to carry him from sideline to sideline in search of the ball. Has extended tackle radius. Durable and reliable. Has the athleticism and awareness to handle man coverage responsibilities against running backs and tight ends. Quick to trigger on throws from zone and limit yards after catch. Plays behind his shoulder rather than behind his hands in take-on situations. Can get entangled against size and slow to disengage. Doesn’t have play strength to fight past angle blocks once they land. Will need to work to keep shoulders squared in his attack. Leveraging his gap and standing his ground could be a challenge. Not a banger or a bend-and-strike finisher. Tends to attack ball carriers up high rather than down low and will slide off of too many would-be tackles. Cunningham’s missed tackles and lack of desired play strength could bother teams, but his consistent production is hard to ignore. Cunningham is a rangy, three-down linebacker who has a nose for the ball and special teams value. His downhill approach is made for attacking 4-3 defenses and Cunningham could become a good, early starter as a run-and-chase weak-side linebacker.

30. EVAN ENGRAM, TE
School: Ole Miss | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Powder Springs, GA
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 234 lbs.

Good explosion over the first 5 yards of his route. Plus athletic ability with easy-opening hips. Nimble feet with quick, controlled strides into and out of his breaks. Accelerates out of his breaks to uncover from defenders for quarterback. Will have to be guarded by defensive backs. Opens quickly to find the ball. Successful working all three levels. Has true vertical speed to attack the seams. Competitive, athletic runner after the catch. Springy leaper. Jumped out of the gym to snare a touchdown over the head of a Georgia defender. Able to pluck balls low, high, and behind him. Needs to learn when and where to sit down in the middle of the field. Must learn to do a better job of working back to the ball. Doesn’t post up defenders effectively. Allows defender to work through him and disrupt the catch. Has had issues with drops and contested catches could be an issue. Allows throws to beat him up at times. Needs to do better job of selling a two-way go to the top of his routes rather than giving route direction away. Move tight end only who lacks dependability as a blocker. Makes up for his lack of size with athletic ability and plus speed for the position. Engram has experience as a safety blanket and can work all three levels of the field. He will appeal strictly to teams looking for a move tight end who can be deployed as a chess piece in a matchup-based passing attack. Engram’s ability to stress defenses could land him a potential starting role early in his career.

31. CAM ROBINSON, OT
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Monroe, LA
Height/Weight: 6-6 / 322 lbs.

Outstanding, proportional frame with combination of thickness and athleticism. Fires into his target with a forceful pop generating early power and push. Can uproot defender and turn him out of hole as a drive blocker. Able to respond to power with power. Can work seamlessly from block to block in combos. Works and climbs to second level with controlled, stalking footwork. Has initial quickness to pull and land on defenders in space. Athletic enough to slide over and catch inside challenges. Usually works feet into position pre-contact in run game. Good length and gets adequate extension in his punch. Kick slide generally balanced and gains necessary ground to the edge. Has feet necessary to mirror edge speed and flatten them over rush arc. Glass-eater who fights hard to the whistle. Balance issues a concern. Struggles with active, high-motor defenders. At times he ducks head into his run blocks, losing sight of a moving target. Narrow in-line power base due to lack of bend and excessive leaning. Weight creeps too far past his feet in both run and pass blocks. Inconsistent sustaining his block. On the ground substantially more than a tackle should be. Has to learn to run his feet under him at contact. Can improve as move blocker with better angles. Questionable instincts. On twists, dives down with defensive ends and will miss loopers around edge. Three-year starter at left tackle who is a road grader with impressive power at the point of attack and enough athleticism to function in diverse run schemes. Robinson has tape galore against SEC edge talent either playing in the NFL or who soon will be. The tape shows a player with the traits and physical ability to be a good NFL tackle, but his balance issues and inconsistencies as a pass protector are a concern.

32. TRE’DAVIOUS WHITE, CB
School: LSU | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Shreveport, LA
Height/Weight: 5-11 / 192 lbs.

Quick twitch with exceptional footwork. Uses controlled hop-steps from press for extended face-up against receivers. Patient in press and rarely commits prematurely. Uses reactive quickness for quick recovery when beaten from slot. Pattern reader will jump path of route and attack throw. Plus click-and-close burst to ball. Stop-start change of direction allows him to shadow in tight quarters. Sticky coverage on crossers and intermediate routes. Improved willingness to attack line of scrimmage and do his part against the run. Three-year punt returner with a return touchdown in each season. Was also used as a gunner. Physicality and play strength a concern from slot. Big-bodied slot targets will post him up in space and drive him off the line in run game. Tackles when necessary, but doesn’t seek out contact. Less technique-oriented and more grabby from slot. Early anchor from off coverage caused struggles opening hips when receivers would stem and go. Recovery-quick but not recovery-fast. Full-time starter for better part of four years and one of the premier mirror-and-match cornerbacks in the game. Has the feet, athleticism and instincts for prolonged coverage responsibilities and his twitch will always have him near the throw. Best suited for all forms of man coverage. Should compete as special teams performer. Lacks run-support physicality to be an every-down corner, but he’s talented enough to challenge for slot duties right away.

33. CHARLES HARRIS, DE
School: Missouri | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Kansas City, MO
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 253 lbs.

Explodes out of his stance in search of gap work vs. run game. Lateral quickness makes it a challenge to reach him or cross his face for offensive linemen. Good first step quickness. Plays with energy and keeps it cranked up until the whistle blows. Runs with high knees and athletic, long strides in the open field. Basketball standout in high school who uses nimble feet for an effective spin move. Can unleash spin counter in either direction. Plays on either side of the line and can play with a hand down or standing up. Uses early speed-to-power to create movement before attacking the tackle’s inside shoulder. Showed some ability to drop in space when called upon. Gives ground on the edge and can be widened out of his run fit. Hands must get better at point of attack. Needs to punch and own the point. Rides on blocks rather than shucks them. Lacks desired glass-chewing mentality against the run. Plays with slow reaction time to counters and misdirection and can lose track of the ball. Needs earlier shoulder turn as rusher to prevent early pass sets from punching him as squared-up rusher. Slow to activate his counter spin back inside. High-cut pass rusher with good athleticism but concerns regarding his ability to drop anchor against the run. His hands can be improved as pass rush weapons, but he has agility and footwork that can’t be taught. Harris can play on the edge in a 4-3 or 3-4 front and should be the next in a line of early contributing defensive ends coming out of Missouri.

34. CALEB BRANTLEY, DT
School: Florida | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Crescent City, FL
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 307 lbs.

Compact frame with lean muscle mass and thickness in his arms and legs. Has tremendous play strength and can dislodge guards with hip torque. Plays hungry and with passion. Able to plant his flag and stand his ground against double teams. When he gets the snap timed up, it’s over. Has the initial quickness and play strength to get into the gap and plow through any and all redirect block attempts. Wants blocker to feel the power in his initial punch. Works off blocks and towards the play. Better pass rusher talent than sack total would indicate. Quick punch and pry opens blockers’ edge allowing him to wedge into the pocket. Efficient mover with no wasted motion. Considers one-on-one blocks a sign of disrespect. May need to add more mass on his frame. Doesn’t possess the lateral agility or quickness to excel as a rusher in twists up front. Not a dynamic pass rusher. Needs to add a counter move for when his power rush stalls out. Has to prove he can handle extended snap count. Part of deep defensive line rotation and was usually kept fresh. Misses out on sacks and tackles for losses due to lack of length to consistently finish when he gets near the play. Guesses snap count. Powerful, stout defensive tackle with the quickness to play the three-technique and the power to play the nose. Brantley has the talent and traits that should appeal to both two-gap and one-gap defenses. While Brantley didn’t play in even half of Florida’s defensive snaps in a single year, the talent is there to become an early starter and a defensive force up front.

35. GAREON CONLEY, CB
School: Ohio State | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Massillon, OH
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 195 lbs.

Has NFL size with above-average length. Plays long. At his best when playing with inside leverage and trapping receivers against the boundary. Shades receivers with a basketball stance — wide base, bent knees and wide arms. Creates challenging throwing lanes to target. Press-man talent with zone instincts. Shows discipline and technique on verticals and curls. Matches with his feet rather than grabbing. Senses when his pattern is designed to clear space for another receiver and reacts accordingly. Has plus burst to the throw. Uses length to play around receiver and bat passes down underneath without interfering. Runs well and sinks into receiver’s lap down the field, getting his head around to make a play on the ball. Plays the ball with soft hands and outstanding timing. Pattern-match was just average when facing off against more advanced route trees. Got caught reaching and holding in attempt to recover. Will occasionally default to face-guarding rather than turning to find ball. Can be slow to digest route combinations and lose track of his man. Doesn’t look as comfortable or confident in off-man. Plays small in run support and needs to work on consistency as a tackler. Gets driven off his spot by blocking receivers and rarely charges forward to attack near the line of scrimmage. Press-corner with experience at both cornerback spots and an ability to fit into a variety of coverage techniques. He plays with good top-end speed and has the ball skills to challenge and defend passes on any level. He can step in right away in zone coverage, but could struggle to match patterns from a pedal. He will likely be targeted by teams seeking long cornerbacks who can crowd and trail receivers down the field. He has the talent to become an early starter, but he must improve in run support.

36. JARRAD DAVIS, ILB
School: Florida | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Kingsland, GA
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 238 lbs.

Plus acceleration to chase all over the field. Scouts say coaches are effusive in their praise of his leadership, work ethic and character. Can be rude to company. Erupts from coiled hips with a jarring pop under the pads of oncoming blockers. Runs downhill with choppy steps in balanced, tackle-ready position. Effective in spy role with athleticism to mirror mobile quarterbacks. Has closing burst that could become a weapon as a blitzer. Wrap-up tackler with strong finishing rate. Improved his discipline pursuing to the sideline. Did a better job of leveraging running backs against the boundary. Forceful redirect of tight ends out of their routes. Good peripheral helps him spot crossing routes without having to drop eyes from the quarterback. Has athletic tools to become better in coverage. Downhill routes to the ball can be problematic. Will step too far downhill and get trapped in traffic on counters or bounces to the perimeter. Needs to play with more consistent technique and positioning to properly leverage his gaps against gap plays. Lateral scrapes sometimes lack patience forcing him to overrun run fits and open cutback lanes. Sometimes prioritizes attacking blockers too high. Has to get better at seeing and working past the blocker and toward the runner rather than issuing so many physical challenges that get him behind in pursuit. Praised for both his football and personal character, Davis has athletic gifts to go along with the character traits teams are looking for. His ability to cover ground, operate with loose hips in space, and finish his tackles make him a draft favorite for some teams. While it is easy to fall in love with the traits and potential, Will have to take better routes to the ball and learn to keep himself clean against blocks. Should be able to compete for an early starting job as a 4-3 outside backer.

37. JOE MIXON, RB
School: Oklahoma | Conference: BIG12
College Experience: Sophomore | Hometown: Oakley, CA
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 226lbs

Outstanding burst to go from first level to third level. Goes from glide to burst quickly and can hit chunk plays between tackles and around corners. Can go from elusive to banger when he needs to. Will drop the pads and drive through tacklers in short yardage spots. Flashy feet for his size. Can jump-cut around defenders in tight quarters. Able to show and go leaving linebackers diving as he escapes out of the side door. Strong stiff-arm helps would-be tacklers catch grass stains. Can turn the corner and create a straightaway to the end zone. True three-down back. Devastating pass catching option. Excellent route runner creating immediate separation. Soft hands to make the easy catch and the one-hander. Will step in and square up his blocking responsibilities in pass game. Some concerned with character beyond his domestic violence incident. Inconsistent as inside runner. Can be too patient at times. Looks for wide-open points of entry before he hits the gas. Can be nonchalant approaching line of scrimmage. Dances downhill allowing running lanes to become creases. Fails to see backside cuts developing on stretch plays. Hops into his downhill cuts rather than a crisp plant-and-go. His draft slot will likely be impacted by his 2014 domestic violence issue. Mixon has the talent to be an every-down, all-day running back with the potential to take over a game on the ground or through the air. Life against weaker Big 12 defenses has created a more relaxed rushing approach for Mixon who will have to play at a faster pace as an NFL back. Mixon’s vision is just average and he could struggle to create for himself in front of a subpar offensive line; however, he can play in any rushing scheme and can be moved all over the field as a matchup option.

38. RYAN ANDERSON, OLB
School: Alabama | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Daphne, AL
Height/Weight: 6-2 / 253 lbs.

Thick through shoulders and chest with good upper-body power. Exhibits professional approach on the field. Disciplined and married to his assignments. Stays clean. Comes into the league with NFL-caliber hand work. Ready hands at point of attack with a willingness to stick and move to avoid being swallowed by size. Sets a sturdy edge and makes a point to physically challenge tight ends early in the game. Will “dead arm” inside shoulder to alter blocker’s balance and sneak around the outside hand. Relentless charge as a pass rusher and gets home thanks to his effort. Leverages runners to the sideline and rarely gives up a cut-back lane. Tackle finisher who is always hustling. Plays teammate ball over hero ball. Has experience at outside linebacker in both 3-4 and 4-3. Relatively average athlete for the position. Lacks desired pursuit speed and closing burst as a 4-3 linebacker. Hips are a little stiff and he lacks plus range of motion. Could struggle with cover skills in space. Short arms could become an issue if asked to stack the edge against NFL tackles. Effort rusher missing desired traits found in consistent NFL pass rushers. Well-schooled with a high football IQ and a history as a winner. His disciplined, assignment-based approach to the game should resonate with defensive coordinators. Lack of length and average athletic traits could put a cap on his draft stock, but he should be a safe pick and a long-time starter as an outside linebacker.

39. GERALD EVERETT, TE
School: South Alabama | Conference: Sun Belt
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Lithonia, GA
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 239 lbs.

Slick athlete with leftover wide receiver traits. Easy acceleration into routes and can blow by safeties who sit down looking for a route break for too long. Good acceleration off of plant foot in route breaks. Can create immediate separation. Carries play speed throughout routes. Cover linebackers are usually in for a rough day vs. Everett, who eats in the middle of the field and shows no fear. Maximizes arm length for wide catch radius. Hands look fairly natural as pass catcher. Adds to totals with yards after catch. Runs physically and with excellent balance. Rips his legs through arm-tackle attempts. Instinctive runner who sets up blocks on bubble screens. Alters stride length to elude diving tackle attempts. Able to work all three levels of the field. Blocks with anger and is prone to longer engagements than most blockers on perimeter. Route running doesn’t appear to be high on his priority list. Routes are rounded, dull and lack urgency. Leans into most of his breaks. Talented cover safeties can jump his routes. Drifts on square-ins, allowing deep safeties a door into the play. Needs work on double moves. Could have issues playing through route redirection off line of scrimmage. Shows deceleration when locating ball on deep throws. Hands are small. Everett has size, speed and tremendous run-after-catch potential, but it is his willingness and ability to block that separates him from other “matchup” tight ends. Route running is below average, but he should improve with NFL coaching. Everett has the talent to become a very good NFL starter with Pro Bowl potential if he puts it all together.

40. BUDDA BAKER, FS
School: Washington | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Bellevue, WA
Height/Weight: 5-10 / 195 lbs.

Tremendously explosive and passionate in his play. Screams off the edge as a blitzer. Always bouncing on balls of his feet just waiting to race to the action on a dead sprint. Plays with smooth backpedal and diagonal shuffle. Has a shiftiness that allows him to mirror change of direction in space. Plus instincts from any coverage areas. Allows quarterback’s eyes and pattern recognition to carry him around the field. Not easily pulled from coverage responsibilities by bait routes around him. Has the click and close ability of a cornerback in coverage. Ball skills are solid. Tackle finisher who races to the throw to end plays at the catch point. Scouts used terms like “winner” and “top notch person” to describe him. Undersized safety in a smaller frame. Gets big-boyed by tight ends from the slot. Lack of size may limit how NFL teams can use him. Aggressive shoulder rolls into running backs could cause future health issues. Force as a tackler just average against big running backs. Forced into grab and drag scenarios to get running backs down at times. Can be too overzealous when stepping downhill to tackle. May need to play with a little more discipline and control as an NFL tackler. Undersized free safety with the heart of a linebacker. Baker plays with a competitive desire that leaps off the field when you watch him thanks to elite football character and above-average explosiveness. While he is undersized, he makes up for it with his football instincts and plus play speed. Baker has the talent to become a play-making safety with Pro Bowl potential if he can sustain his health.

41. SIDNEY JONES, CB
School: Washington | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Diamond Bar, CA
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 186 lbs.

Competes all over the field. Doesn’t play pitty-pat with his jam from press. Throws stiff lead right into the shoulder of receivers like a boxer. Maximizes contact with receivers within first five yards. Eyes are top notch. Balances between quarterback’s eyes and his man from all off coverages. Ready to close on throws anywhere near his area. Route magnet. Pattern anticipation allows him to map receivers path and undercut route. Prioritizes ball over man and attacks catch point with slaps and rips. Early ball tracker with length and leaping to attack the high point. Mirrors receiver acceleration out of their breaks. Twitchy feet for click-and-close transitions and instant change of direction from shuffle technique. Solid recovery quickness. Tore his Achilles tendon at his pro day which will require an extensive rehab process. Carries slender frame. Needs to add upper body strength in preparation for NFL size. Gets impatient from press. Loses positioning by reaching and lunging to get hands on receiver rather than letting the release come to him. Can still improve his transition footwork. Fights his hips a little when flipping to change direction in open field. Physical receivers can wall him out of tackle action in run support. Jones is a “casino cornerback” who has the ball skills and instincts to tilt the odds in his favor when quarterbacks look his way. His toughness and desire to make plays on the ball are remarkable. Jones has lockdown corner talent but unfortunately, teams will have to wrestle with his draft positioning as there is no guarantee that Jones can come back with the same quickness and speed as before.

42. JOSH JONES, SS
School: NC State | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Walled Lake, MI
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 220 lbs.

Possesses prototypical combination of size and speed. Has acceleration and top-end speed to range all over the field. Plus athletic ability and reactive quickness. Has ability to disguise his coverage before sprinting back to centerfield. Has experience with both safety spots. Fluid in his movement and is an explosive leaper when challenging at the high-point. Has the ball skills to rake it or take it. Plays with eager eyes that stay glued to quarterback’s intentions. Has the closing burst to challenge throws. Extremely aggressive. Bouncy feet can’t wait to fire downhill and hit something. Accelerates through the collision. Does a good job of punching and playing off of blockers. His aggression is a double-edged sword. Will come in too hot looking to lay the lumber and end up missing his mark as a tackler. Needs to do better job of coming to balance as a tackler. From zone coverage, can be a little slow to anticipate routes and squeeze the throwing windows. Gets hyper-focused on quarterback and will lose track of his assignments. Will bite on play-action bait and get drawn out of position. Jones is a height-weight-speed prospect to be sure, but he’s not just a traits-based safety. Jones has the appetite for hitting that teams will want around the box and he has the speed and ball skills to range and help against vertical threats from a deep safety spot. The big area of concern will be Jones’ ability to play with better discipline in coverage and as a tackler. He has the ability to become a good, long-time starter in the league.

43. T.J. WATT, OLB
School: Wisconsin | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Pewaukee, WI
Height/Weight: 6-4 / 252 lbs.

Produced at high-end level with just one season of full-time football. Has desired length for the edge with room to accommodate more size. Attacks blockers with early arm extension and utilizes push-pull technique to upset their balance as his pet move against run and pass. Outstanding hand play in his game. Disruptive as first man in on twists. Always ready to leap into passing lane and deflect the throw. Strikes fast and early to create leverage points. Rarely has helmet involved in play and is constantly searching for the ball. Understands art of quick disengagements and can flatten out against outside run. Has good agility to clear trash near his feet and pursue the ball. Functional in space when asked to cover. Can get skinny when shooting gaps and has decisiveness and pursuit quickness to crash down the line and close-out cutback lanes. Consistent, wrap-up finisher as tackler. Short strider who lacks explosion out of stance and up the field to bend the edge as a pass rusher. Foot quickness is average and needs to win with technique and great hand play. Won’t generate enough acceleration to crank up speed-to-power rush with consistency. Plays with a narrow base. Needs to play with more consistent bend to play through redirection by offensive line. Will have to add power in his base to hold point of attack against tackles. Pass rush menu will need more options against NFL tackles. A long-limbed effort rusher who posted impressive numbers against the run and pass in just one year as a starter. He is a tireless worker who pursues from snap to whistle and his brother, J.J., will be a tremendous resource for technique and pass-rush plan. While he is unlikely to win a race to the edge, he’s a plus run defender who can get to the quarterback with plus hand work and relentless effort.

44. TEEZ TABOR, CB
School: Florida | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Washington, DC
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 199 lbs.

Prototypical size and athleticism. Plays with bouncy feet in coverage. Good initial patience and foot quickness to mirror receiver’s release from press. Has the quick twitch to accelerate and pattern match receivers throughout their routes. Has recovery speed to bird-dog crossers. From zone, can split high/low routes and is quick enough to challenge the catch on either. Has agility and change of direction to come off of one route and pick up the next. Shines when the ball is in the air. Pro-ready closing burst. Has excellent hand-eye coordination. Hands and timing help turn opportunities into interceptions. Willing to unload into receiver’s ribs in order jar a ball free. Often played excessively deep off-coverage. Shows balance issues in space. Occasionally loses footing in coverage during his transition. Shows willingness to sit on routes and grab receivers trying to go vertical rather than flipping hips to chase. Can be undisciplined from zone losing track of his responsibilities. Appears to be hit or miss with instinctive playmaking. Finesse cornerback. Avoids mixing it up with physical receivers away from the ball. Considered a high-maintenance prospect. Has been suspended due to drug tests and a run-in with a teammate in practice. Tabor has terrific size and quickness. While he has some lapses in judgement and awareness in coverage, his nine career interceptions didn’t happen by accident. He is a pure cover corner with the ability to pattern match around the field, but don’t expect him to be a plus tackler in run support. He has the traits of a first-round cornerback, but some teams may be put off by some of his annoyances.

45. JUJU SMITH-SCHUSTER, WR
School: Southern California | Conference: PAC12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Long Beach, CA
Height/Weight: 6-1 / 215 lbs.

Outstanding size and a very available target. Shows no concern working over the middle. Hyper-aware of defenders around him in space. Works back to the ball as aggressively as he needs to when defenders are attempting to ball-hawk. Searches and sinks into the optimal openings against zone coverage. Plays to his size and has plus route strength. Shows effective uses of frame to shield cornerbacks from contested catches. Plucks it way out front of his body with strong, confident hands. Tremendous ball tracker with ability to search, find and follow the pass in over his shoulder. Has body control to twist and contort in mid-air to pull the throw in. Plays with sideline awareness and consistently drops feet in-bounds on boundary catches. Rugged, aggressive runner after the catch with a stiff-arm to hurt feelings. Reliable blocker who can help spring a big run. Able to sustain blocks with power. Outstanding size and a very available target. Needs to get better at freeing himself at the break point of his routes. Doesn’t seem to get cornerbacks tilting with his routes. Missing the sudden acceleration out of his cuts to generate separation and an easy throwing window. Contested catches will have to be a big part of his future. Rarely shows a second gear to run under the deep throws. Will coast when turning to find deep ball rather than maintaining play speed. Off-man corners may squat on underneath routes if they don’t fear his vertical speed. Can be slow to release against press coverage. Smith-Schuster will get dinged for his lack of speed and separation but his strong hands, physical approach and ability to win the combat catches will make up for that. JuJu is missing some of the speed traits teams want from their WR1, but he could become a high-volume, possession target with the size tto win some 50/50 throws down the field. Teams who have a speed merchant at one spot would be wise to take a look at Smith-Schuster as a physical counterpart.

46. PATRICK MAHOMES II, QB
School: Texas Tech | Conference: BIG12
College Experience: Junior | Hometown: Whitehouse, TX
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 215lbs

Possesses NFL body type for work inside and out of the pocket. Has an undeniable swagger and confidence to his game. Accuracy has improved in each season since his freshman year. Naturally accurate in his every day throws. Comfortable challenging defenders in space. Has arm strength and fearlessness to attack the cover-2 voids down the sideline. Can make deep, field side throws. Cranks up velocity to fit passes into tight windows. Former pitcher who propels hips through his release with aggressive torque and never gets cheated on his follow-through. Can deliver strikes from a variety of arm angles. Relaxed and effective when throwing on the move. Can be a legitimate dual-threat in a boot-action offense. Has pocket mobility to escape pressure and the poise to extend plays and find alternate targets. Hands are very strong. Can be inconsistent in his approach. Needs to play inside the offense and show more discipline. Too eager to go big game hunting. Ravenous appetite for the explosive play can also bring unwanted trouble. Willingness to default to playground style appears to limit his ability to get into a consistent rhythm. Needs to improve anticipatory reads and learn to take what the defense gives him. Decision making can go from good to bad in a moment’s notice. Operates from a narrow base and allows his upper body and arm to race ahead of his feet. Mahomes is a big, confident quarterback who brings a variety of physical tools to the party, but he’s developed some bad habits and doesn’t have a very repeatable process as a passer. Mahomes’ ability to improvise and extend plays can lead to big plays for his offense, but he will have to prove he can operate with better anticipation and be willing to take what the defense gives him in order to win from the pocket. Mahomes will be a work in progress, but he’s a high ceiling, low floor prospect.

47. PAT ELFLEIN, C
School: Ohio State | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Pickerington, OH
Height/Weight: 6-3 / 303 lbs.

Renown for his outrageous work ethic. Strong leadership characteristics both verbally and by example. Looks for work when uncovered. Smartly alters assignment based on flow of the defense. Always under control in his movements. Patient pull blocker who stalks his target rather than rushing the block. Plus play strength and wrestling background gives him a leg up in hand-to-hand combat against big dogs inside. Quick to roll hips into block after first contact. Drives feet through contact and uses strong hands to stick like glue to the block. Reliable and effective in down blocks. Finisher looking to make a statement at the end of the play. Has mental part down. Recognizes twisting defensive tackles and greets them with aggressiveness. Hand placement is excellent. Strikes with upward blows squarely into the strike zone as run blocker. Pass-pro punch is compact with some heat behind it. Can anchor against bull rush. Winning history on high-caliber team. Versatile; proficient and successful at both center and guard. Footwork can be a little labored at times for the center position. Marginal twitch with short-area reaction time that is just average. A bit of a straight-line player in space. Struggles to come off initial block and body up against delayed, A-gap blitzers. Understands leverage but hip stiffness causes pad level to rise as play rolls along. Anticipates early bull rush and will drop an early anchor. Not always first with his hands. Gives away his chest to interior defenders with good hand quickness. Elflein is a smart, tireless worker with a winning background and experience at all three interior offensive line spots. While his feet are just average, his core strength and wrestling background could make him a favorite of teams looking for more strength at the center position. Elflein will have occasional issues in pass protection, but his strength as a run blocker and ability to play with excellent hands and plus body control should make him one of the first interior linemen to come off the draft board.

48. MARCUS MAYE, FS
School: Florida | Conference: SEC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Melbourne, FL
Height/Weight: 6-0 / 210 lbs.

Ready-made safety frame with muscular build and long arms. Really instinctive with above-average field vision and feel for the game. Eyes dart back and forth from quarterback to receiver. Correlates quarterback’s eyes and actions to a corresponding route and gets the early jump. Plays with good pattern recognition from both man and zone. Credited with a pass breakup or interception on more than 21 percent of his targets as a starter. Has speed to burst from sideline to sideline. Rangy tackler with in-play endurance for extended chases across field. Welcomes physical aspects of position. Sheds blockers quickly. Showed improved patience and diligence as tackler. Trustworthy as last line of defense. Inconsistent ball tracker. Has issues playing both ball and man down the field, and can lose feel with receiver. Tape shows some issues with hip tightness. Balance can be a little spotty and he’ll fight his hips when forced to transition suddenly on combination routes. Better coming downhill than playing on his heels. Interchangeable safety with the instincts of a free safety and the physicality of a box player. Thrives as a downhill player and has the instincts and speed to operate effectively from both single-high and two-deep looks. Has the physical attributes and intelligence to step into a starter’s role early on and will be a strong contributor on special teams.

49. DAN FEENEY, OG
School: Indiana | Conference: BIG10
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Orland Park, IL
Height/Weight: 6-4 / 305 lbs.

Tough guy with a banger mentality. Decent arm length for the position. Above-average pass protector on interior. Feet are light enough to slide quickly in either direction to protect the edge in pass-pro. Very aware of twists and blitzes. Shoots a strong punch that can jar gap shooters out of the gap and can put a sting into both twisters as he snaps and catches. Zone-blocking specialist with desired lateral quickness. Takes well-planned routes up to second-level targets on difficult backside cutoffs. Able to get around corner with pace when asked to long pull. Good patience. Finds his landmarks and strikes them. Rarely commits early to a block. Waits until he’s in proper position. Plays with redirect power in his upper body. Will take it to the whistle and looks to finish with some menace. Effective blocker in screen game. Poor pad level and a narrow base creates contact-balance issues. Shows a lack of knee bend that makes change of direction in space a task. Is a bit straight-linish in his approach. Unable to generate consistent push as a base blocker. Needs to improve hip sink for better leverage and to sustain his blocks. Hand speed is decent but punch is a little wide. Feeney is a quality zone blocker with an ability to pull and lead the charge, but he might lack the play strength to become a reliable base blocker. His intelligence and ability to operate in space and protect the quarterback could make him an early starter with a ceiling of above-average NFL guard or center.

50. DORIAN JOHNSON, OG
School: Pittsburgh | Conference: ACC
College Experience: Senior | Hometown: Belle Vernon, PA
Height/Weight: 6-5 / 300 lbs.

Solid athlete when asked to play in space. Plays with leg drive as run blocker. Uses choppy, accelerated feet into contact and keeps chopping them through contact to secure the block. Operates with quality balance and limited waist-bending. Has the arm length of a tackle. Understands his job on each play. Has an accurate radar in seeking out second-level targets and connecting at a high percentage. Excels on short pulls with smooth lateral footwork and solid, squared contact. Keeps hands inside and will punch and re-set hands when necessary. Sets up with good base and anchor in pass pro. Is a little inconsistent with smoothness coming out of his stance. At times too aggressive when he moves up to second level and will climb beyond his target. Needs to improve patience on his climb to create more consistency with his angles. Needs to let hands go more quickly in run game. Punches and pushes target with authority but doesn’t snatch the framework and lock in, allowing active defenders to spin and squirm out of his blocks. Johnson was a full-time starter for three years at Pitt and was known for his consistency and well-rounded game. He has functional power to turn defenders out of the hole and enough athleticism to match any run-game scheme. Johnson doesn’t carry bad weight and should be able to add more bulk with no problem. While he has some weaknesses, nothing appears to be glaring and he should set into a starter’s role right away and become a solid NFL guard.

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